mutikoree:

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mutikoree:

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2,732 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

(Source: princemaedhros)


77 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

*melts*

(Source: oswald-souffle)


6,735 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

"She drinks pints of coffee and writes little observations and ideas for stories with her best fountain pen on the linen-white pages of expensive notebooks. Sometimes, when it’s going badly, she wonders if what she believes to be a love of the written word is really just a fetish for stationery."

-David Nicholls, One Day  (via a-sensible-heart)

(Source: larmoyante)


1,596 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

apriki:

Downton Abbey 1x02 // 2x01

Let’s talk about this parallel right here. The producers have put Matthew and Mary - who are seeing each other for the first time in a long time - in the exact same positions that they were in during their first dinner together, back in 1x02. They do this for the familiarity; their context and purposes may have changed, but these people are still the Matthew and Mary that we, the audience, have grown acquainted with. It means something in-world, too, as Matthew/Mary have this established rapport that revolves around the things they say taking a deeper meaning and both reflecting and contradicting the way that they feel. This begins when they first meet in 1x02, with Mary’s scathing “I wouldn’t want to push in”, and builds from there, becoming as much a part of them as it is a symbol of their relationship.

In 2x01 this element of Matthew/Mary is moulded again, this time to fit the WWI backdrop of the season. Matthew comes home to Downton and tries as best he can to leave the war behind him, taking comfort in the routines and regularity he equates with that lifestyle. But his want to leave the war behind is not synonymous with what actually happens, and he finds himself seeing things at a distance; in many ways returning home and feeling like he doesn’t is more difficult for him than facing the war front. And then there’s Mary - Matthew is close to his mother and loves her dearly, but Mary is his only true equal, and the only person in the world who he can speak candidly to - through their established repertoire, of course. It’s Mary alone who asks him what the war front is like - everyone else keeps up the charade that Downton is a refuge away from the conflict, for Matthew - and if it was anyone else Matthew would’ve gone into military strategy, or brushed off the question; only it’s Mary, so he doesn’t. He tells her that he can’t talk about it; not that he doesn’t want to or that he doesn’t need to, but that he can’t. It’s an emotional repsonse and he feels safe enough to give it because it’s Mary, and Mary is the only one who is able to see his heart.

*dies*


392 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

(Source: )


127 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

"Yes, it’s beautiful,” said Gilbert, looking steadily down into Anne’s uplifted face, “but wouldn’t it have been more beautiful still, Anne, if there had been no separation or misunderstanding … if they had come hand in hand all the way through life, with no memories behind them but those which belonged to each other?"

-Anne of Avonlea, L.M. Montgomery (via ripthepage)

(Source: fiercerwonders)


39 notes | Reblog
1 year ago
tolkienianos:

thelastofthelongbottomleaf:

Lord of the Rings: a much darker story than you think it is.

The river Gollum achieved was the Great River and not the Brandywine River. At least that’s what Gandalf infers here: 

” ‘…why didn’t he track Bilbo further?’ asked Frodo. ‘Why didn’t he come to The Shire?’ ‘Ah’ , said Gandalf, ‘now we come to it. I think Gollum tried to. Het set out and came back westward, as far as the Great River. But then he turned aside. He was not daunted by the distance, I am sure. No, something else drew him away.’ ” 

At the other hand the dates may meet. Once Bilbo returned from his adventure at 2941 T.A. and Drogo Baggins and Primula Brandybuck died at 2980 T.A. (Frodo was 12). I don’t know, if it was real then gosh, how mindblowing would it actually be.. but for me it doesn’t sound plausible. But hey, that’s just me.

This puts a very new and very interesting perspective on things.

tolkienianos:

thelastofthelongbottomleaf:

Lord of the Rings: a much darker story than you think it is.

The river Gollum achieved was the Great River and not the Brandywine River. At least that’s what Gandalf infers here:


” ‘…why didn’t he track Bilbo further?’ asked Frodo. ‘Why didn’t he come to The Shire?’ ‘Ah’ , said Gandalf, ‘now we come to it. I think Gollum tried to. Het set out and came back westward, as far as the Great River. But then he turned aside. He was not daunted by the distance, I am sure. No, something else drew him away.’ ”


At the other hand the dates may meet. Once Bilbo returned from his adventure at 2941 T.A. and Drogo Baggins and Primula Brandybuck died at 2980 T.A. (Frodo was 12). I don’t know, if it was real then gosh, how mindblowing would it actually be.. but for me it doesn’t sound plausible. But hey, that’s just me.

This puts a very new and very interesting perspective on things.

(Source: tookoftheshire)


190 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

(Source: terriblemistakes)


84 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

363 notes | Reblog
1 year ago

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